Dalston

It’s journey from being described as ‘the wrong side of Kingsland Road’ (thanks for that Tony Blair) to The Guardian announcing it as the coolest place to live in Britain, Dalston’s rise to prominence has been stratospheric.



One of the four host boroughs for the Olympic Games, Dalston was completely rejuvenated in 2012 and quickly became one of the most sought after areas of London – not only to reside, but to work. 



It’s become an area synonymous with opening its arms to every possible culture and ethnicity. Jewish arrivals from Europe in the 40’s, Caribbean residents in the 60’s and its mix of Turkish, Vietnamese and Polish communities today has inspired a unique and diverse melting pot environment, open to all.

To Eat and Drink

Dalston’s food and drink scene is right now arguably the most exciting in the country – if not Europe. 



Synonymous with pop-up restaurants and secret bars and late night revelry, it has played host to some of London’s most exciting openings over the last decade. 



The indulgent and boozy stretch from Stoke Newington High Street to Kingsland Road is adorned by legendary cocktail bars including The Venning Brother’s Three Sheets, Ruby’s and Original Sin (Happiness Forget’s sequel).



And world class cuisine with a drinks menu to match is harder to miss than it is to hunt out. Tony Conigliaro’s Untitled, the Japanese driven Brilliant Corners and Vegetarian only Mildred’s is a hint to the diverse mix of food and drink on the doorstep.

To See and Do

You kind of have to be there. Dalston is a place where words will simply not do it justice. But we’ll do our best. 



One of London’s last remaining Art Deco cinemas, the beautiful Rio Cinema is not only iconic, but central to the local community. 



Created along the railway line of the same name, Dalston’s Eastern Curve Garden is a community run project hosting yoga sessions and live music within its pavilion. 



And Dalston Roofpark offers incredible views of the capital’s skyline with Tiki cocktails on hand to see you into the night.



And if those words haven’t convinced you, we think Hanna Hanra, former editor of a Dalston based publication, summed it up perfectly. 



”You can walk down the road and see everything from Pam Hogg squeezing a melon in the Ridley Road market to a man wearing a sack preaching to the traffic lights. 
Everything is possible.”

Offices